Article – What do packaging labels tell us about industrialization and the brazilian  reality? – an interdisciplinary report

The purpose of this work was to explore the packaging labels of products consumed in everyday life by students, seeing them as textual and geographic and biological information genres and thus, through them, introduce the curricular contents in ten (10) 1st year classes of the Integrated Technical Education of CEFET-MG, in Belo Horizonte – MG, Brazil, in an interdisciplinary view in the subjects of Geography and Biology. Topics concerning the progress of industrialization in the Brazilian territory and the quality of products were discussed, especially those consumed by the population (nutritional data and its technical vocabulary, processing of industrialized foods, malnutrition and food exports, expansion of agribusiness…), associating them with the movement of globalization of the world economy. Among the topics studied, we also highlight: history and spatialization of industry, transformation of geographic space, stages of Brazilian industrialization, urbanization, concentration of infrastructure, consumer market, internationalization of the economy, labor qualification, degree of nationalization by industrial sector, privatization, industrial decentralization, precariousness of labor rights, among others. Exercises were carried out based on the data collected using printed maps, in addition to the use of the Google Earth app, devices used to locate industries in the country, which also contributes to a better perception of cartographic images. In a didactic investigation that combined prosaic resources – packaging labels – with geotechnology – the Google Earth application, the need for diversification of instruments and methodologies used in the classroom is evidenced, which together with adequate planning can help students to achieve meaningful learning, as happened in this reported experience. The theoretical-methodological foundations that guided this work are present, especially, in the theories of David Ausubel and Jerome Bruner.